Skip to main content

COM 110 Navigating the Media Landscape: Home

Librarians Can Help!

Librarians are here to support you through this sudden change to online learning.  Check out the Library Resources and Support course in eLearn, or contact us by:

 

Text: 508.709.0223

Email: librarydeskgroup@stonehill.edu

Tel: 508.565.1313

Make a Virtual Appointment

The Assignment

An Introduction to the Assignment:

Your final project of the semester is two-fold:

Part 1: The Annotated Bibliography:

First you will write an annotated bibliography (i.e., annotations of scholarly research studies) on a media-related topic of your choice.  An annotated bibliography is a list of citations of scholarly journal articles, books and/or book chapters.  Each citation is followed by a brief (usually 150-200 words) descriptive and evaluative paragraph (i.e., the annotation). The purpose of the annotation is to discuss the relevance, usefulness and quality of the scholarly literature. In short, your annotated bibliography helps you to organize and keep notes on the many articles that will ultimately inform your literature review paper.  (*A minimum of 12 annotations is required for your final annotated bibliography).   

Part II: The Literature Review Paper

For the second component, you will complete a critical, in-depth literature review based on the scholarly literature you have located and examined.  A literature review summarizes, interprets, and critically examines existing scholarly literature (i.e., published journal articles, book chapters) in order to establish current knowledge of a subject and identify remaining gaps in the research (i.e., questions that are in need of answers).

Length: 12 to 15 pages, plus title page and works cited page

Due: November 20

Required Scholarly Citations: A minimum of 12 scholarly sources/citations

Why Write a Literature Review?

  • Allows you to become familiar with key studies and emerging research on a specific topic
  • Allows you to compare and contrast related studies and their findings
  • Demonstrates your expertise on a topic
  • Allows you to serve as a “moderator” in the evaluation of scholarly literature
  • Most important, a literature review enables you to identify the “gaps” in the literature (i.e., what lines of inquiry need additional research?)

 

Verbs that Describe what Texts Do

VERBS THAT DESCRIBE WHAT TEXTS DO

adds details about …            

asks us to sympathize            

asks the question(s)

cites an expert            

compares        

contradicts    

 tells a joke

demonstrates                          

describes        

dramatizes (i.e., tells a story about)

draws a conclusion     

elaborates       

evaluates        

explains          

gives details                           

informs           

interprets        

introduces

opposes                      

predicts          

proposes         

qualifies

rebuts                                     

reflects           

repeats            

speculates

suggests/hints             

summarizes     

supports          

shows the writer’s own feelings

gives an example                    

provokes an emotion              

gives background info

demonstrates the writer’s qualifications to talk about the topic

 

-- And there are many, many other things that a text can do, as you’ll see when you start examining texts in this way, and consciously planning your own texts in this way.

 

Of course, to make a complete statement, you have to include exactly what the paragraph proposes, or describes, or suggests, or gives details about, or explains, or what emotion it provokes in the audience, etc.

 

 

(Adapted from Bean, Chapman, and Gillam, Reading Rhetorically, Pearson, 2012 – who are in turn drawing from the work of Kenneth Bruffee)

Librarian

Heather Perry's picture
Heather Perry
Contact:
Library 110
508-565-1538
libguide_footer
Login to LibApps Noice of Web Accessibility