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Chicago 17th: Images: Images

Format of Footnote

FOOTNOTE FORMAT 

Footnotes go at the bottom of the page where the reference occurs. 

Within the essay text: put the note number at the end of the sentence where the reference occurs, even if the cited material is mentioned at the beginning of the sentence. 

The note number goes after all other punctuation. 

Be sure to use Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3) not Roman (i, ii, iii). 

Single space each entry; double space between entries. 

Indent the first line of each note. 

Never reuse a number - use a new number for each reference, even if you have used that reference previously. 

Use a shortened form examples for sources you refer to more than once. 

To cite multiple sources in a single note, separate the two citations with a semicolon. Never use two note numbers at the end of a sentence. 

CHICAGO Images Paintings, Photographs and Sculptures

PATTERN 

#. Artist’s First Name Last Name, Title of Work, Year created, medium, Sponsor or repository, URL. 

FOOTNOTE 

30. Donatello, Madonna of the Clouds, about 1425-35, sculpture stone; Marble, Boston Museum of Art, http://www.mfa.org/collections/object/madonna-of-the-clouds-58904.  

 

PATTERN 

Artist Last Name, First Name. Title of Work. Year created, Medium. Sponsor or Repository, URL.  

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Donatello. Madonna of the Clouds. About 1425-35. Sculpture Stone; Marble.  Boston Museum of Art, http://www.mfa.org/collections/object/madonna-of-the-clouds-58904.  

 

The Chicago Manual of Style 17th edition states that information about paintings, photographs, sculptures, or other works of art can usually be presented in the text rather than in a note or bibliography.  (CMOS 14.235)

 

REPRODUCED IN BOOK

PATTERN 
#. Artist's First Name Last Name, Title of Artwork, Date of Work, Museum or Gallery, in Author’s First Name Last Name, Title of Book (Place of Publication: Publisher, Date), page number.

FOOTNOTE  

34. Edward Hopper, August in the City, 1945, Norton Gallery and School of Art, in Gail Levin, Edward Hopper: The Art and the Artist (New York, NY: Norton, 1980), 197.

PATTERN  Author/Editor’s Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publishers, Date.  

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Levin, Gail. Edward Hopper: The Art and the Artist. New York, NY: Norton, 1980. 

 

The Chicago Manual of Style 17th edition states that information about paintings, photographs, sculptures, or other works of art can usually be presented in the text rather than in a note or bibliography.  (CMOS 14.235)

 

PATTERN 
#. First name, Last name of Artist. Title of Work, Year created, Medium, Name of Museum, Location of Museum. 

FOOTNOTE 

11. Pablo Picasso, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, Year created, oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY. 

PATTERN 

Last Name, First Name of Artist. Title of Work. Year Created. Medium. Name of Museum, Location of Museum. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Picasso, Pablo. Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. 1907. Oil on canvas. Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY.  

 

The Chicago Manual of Style 17th edition states that information about paintings, photographs, sculptures, or other works of art can usually be presented in the text rather than in a note or bibliography.  (CMOS 14.235)

PATTERN 
#. First Name Last Name of Artist, Title of Work, Year created, Medium, Museum or Collection, Location, date accessed, URL. 


FOOTNOTE 

13. Edward Hopper, Table for Ladies, 1930, Oil on canvas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, accessed November 30, 2012, http://www.artstor.org. 

PATTERN

Last Name, First Name of Artist. Title of Work. Year created. Medium, Museum or Collection. Location. Date accessed URL. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hopper, Edward. Table for Ladies. 1930. Oil on canvas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. August 3, 2015. http://www.artstor.org.

 

The Chicago Manual of Style 17th edition states that information about paintings, photographs, sculptures, or other works of art can usually be presented in the text rather than in a note or bibliography.  (CMOS 14.235)

EXAMPLES OF ARRANGEMENT OF AUTHORS

Authors’ names are arrange is the following format for both books and journal entries.

Use “an,” not an ampersand, “&,” for multi-author entries.

One author

Footnote
Joseph Callahan,

Bibliography 
Callahan, Joseph.

 

Two to Three Authors

Footnote
Mary Callahan and Fred Silver,

Bibliography 
Callahan, Mary and Fred Silver.

 

Four to Ten Authors

In the bibliography write out all of the authors, in the notes only write out the first author plus “et al".
Footnote
Charles F. Curley et al.,

Bibliography
Curley, Charles F., Mary Joan Smith, Christopher Kendris, Jennifer Burns, and Heather Pearson.

Images should be cited in all cases, even if the image is very small, or in the public domain. The citation should be accessible in the context of the image's use (within a Powerpoint presentation, on a web page, in a paper, etc.). 

Include the following: 

Artist's name 

Title of the work 

Date it was created 

Material or medium (oil on canvas, marble, found objects, etc.)   

Dimensions of the work  

Repository, museum, or owner (in other words, where it is now located)

Location of Institution 

 
If you found the image in a book, you will also need the author, title, publisher 
information, date, page, and figure or plate number of the reproduction. If you 
found the image online, you will need an access date, the web site address 
(URL), and, in some cases, an image ID number. 

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