Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Chicago 17th: Websites: Websites

Format of Footnote

FOOTNOTE FORMAT 

Footnotes go at the bottom of the page where the reference occurs. 

Within the essay text: put the note number at the end of the sentence where the reference occurs, even if the cited material is mentioned at the beginning of the sentence. 

The note number goes after all other punctuation. 

Be sure to use Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3) not Roman (i, ii, iii). 

Single space each entry; double space between entries. 

Indent the first line of each note. 

Never reuse a number - use a new number for each reference, even if you have used that reference previously. 

Use a shortened form examples for sources you refer to more than once. 

To cite multiple sources in a single note, separate the two citations with a semicolon. Never use two note numbers at the end of a sentence. 

CHICAGO Webpages, Websites and Social Media

PRIMARY DOCUMENT 
 
PATTERN 
#. Author of Document First Name Last Name, “Title of Document,” Title of Web Site, Sponsor of Web Site, accessed Month Day, Year, http://www.www.www. 

FOOTNOTE 

11. Abraham Lincoln, “Draft of the Emancipation Proclamation,” Mr. Lincoln’s Virtual Library, Library of Congress, accessed July 19, 2012, http://www.memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/almss/dep001.html. 


PATTERN 

Author of Document Last Name, First Name. “Title of Document.” Title of Web Site. Sponsor of Web Site. Accessed Month Day, Year. http://www.www.www. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Lincoln, Abraham. “Draft of the Emancipation Proclamation.” Mr. Lincoln’s Virtual Library. Library of Congress. Accessed July 19, 2012. http://www.memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/almss/dep001.html. 


CORPORATE AUTHOR
  
PATTERN 

#. Corporate Author, “Title of Web Page,” Sponsor, date site was last modified/updated, URL. 
 
FOOTNOTE  

12. Academic Technology and User Services, “Office 365 for Students - Frequently Asked Questions,” Western Washington University, last modified February 9, 2015, http://west.wwu.edu/atus/helpdesk/office365faq.shtml.  

PATTERN 

Corporate Author. “Title of Web Page.” Sponsor. Date site was last modified/updated. URL. 
 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Academic Technology and User Services. “Office 365 for Students - Frequently Asked Questions.” Western Washington University. Last modified February 9, 2015. http://west.wwu.edu/atus/helpdesk/office365faq.shtml.  
 
If site does not have a date give the date you accessed the site.  


NO AUTHOR 

PATTERN 

#. “Title of Web Site,” Owner or Sponsor of the site, access date, http//www.www.www.  

FOOTNOTE 

11. “Distracted Driving Campaign,” Brockton Police Department, City of Brockton, accessed July 27, 2018, http://www.brocktonpolice.com/2017/04/06/distracted-driving-campaign/.

 PATTERN 

“Title of Web Site.” Owner or Sponsor of the site. Access date.  http://www.www.www. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY  

“Distracted Driving Campaign.” Brockton Police, City of Brockton. Accessed July 27, 2018. http://www.brocktonpolice.com/2017/04/06/distracted-driving-campaign/. 

NO AUTHOR 

PATTERN 

#. Title of Web Site (website), Owner or Sponsor of the site, access date, http//www.www.www.  
 

FOOTNOTE 

11. Boston.gov (Website), City of Boston, accessed July 27, 2018, https://www.boston.gov/. 

 
PATTERN 

Title of Web Site (Website). Owner or Sponsor of the site. Access date. http://www.www.www. 

In this example I included (Website) because the nature of source was unclear. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY  

Boston.gov. (Website). City of Boston. Accessed July 27, 2018. https://www.boston.gov/.

A POST 

PATTERN 

#. Author of post First Name Last Name, “Text of the Post,” Facebook, Date, URL.  

FOOTNOTE 

17. MacPhaidin Library, Stonehill College, “The Academic & Welcome Center is nearly finished! The #Library looms on the right. #students #parents #staff #faculty’s,” Facebook, July 19, 2018, https://www.facebook.com/macphaidinlibrary. 

PATTERN 

Author of post Last Name, First Name. “Text of the Post.” Facebook, Date. URL.  

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

MacPhaidin Library, Stonehill College. “The Academic & Welcome Center is nearly finished! The #Library looms on the right. #students #parents #staff #faculty’s.” Facebook, July 19, 2018. https://www.facebook.com/macphaidinlibrary. 

PATTERN 

#. Author of Post First Name Last Name (Twitter account), “comment on Twitter,” Type of post the social media service, Date, time, URL. 

FOOTNOTE 

32. Stonehill College (@stonehill_info), “Welcome to all the campers visiting Stonehill's campus for the greatest sports camps in the world!,” Twitter, July 19, 2018, 12:34 p.m., https://twitter.com/stonehill_info/status/1020029024456912897. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Do not include individual comments posted to social networking site in the bibliography.  

PATTERN 

#. Author of Entry First Name Last Name, “Title of Blog Entry,” Title of Blog (blog), Title of Publication, Date of Post, http://www.xxx.www. 

FOOTNOTE 

7. Andrew Rudalevige, “Reagan and KAL 007,” Monkey Cage (blog), Washington Post, July 18, 2014, http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2014/07/18/reagan-and-kal-007/. 

PATTERN 

Author of Entry Last Name, First Name. “Title of Blog Entry.” Title of Blog (blog). Title of Publication. Date of Post. http://www.xxx.www.  

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Rudalevige, Andrew.  “Reagan and KAL 007.” Monkey Cage (blog). Washington Post. July 18, 2014. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2014/07/18/reagan-and-kal-007/. 

Do not include (blog) if the blog is included in the title.

YOU CAN CITE AN ENTRY TWO DIFFERENT WAYS 

AS A REFERENCE WORK 

PATTERN 

#. Wikipedia, s.v. "Title of Entry," last modified date, time, URL. 

FOOTNOTE 

22. Wikipedia, s.v. "Tango," last modified July 21, 2018, 11:50, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tango. 

Online reference works are normally cited in the notes rather than in bibliographies. (CMOS 14.233) 

AS A WEBPAGE  

PATTERN 

#. "Title of Entry," Wikimedia Foundation, last modified July 31, 2108, 22:58, URL.  

FOOTNOTE 

6. "Wikipedia: Manual of Style," Wikimedia Foundation, last modified July 31, 2108, 22:58, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Manual_of_Style. 

PATTERN 

"Title of Entry." Wikimedia Foundation. Last modified July 31, 2108, 22:58. URL.  

BIBLIOGRAPHY  

"Wikipedia: Manual of Style." Wikimedia Foundation. Last modified July 31, 2108, 22:58. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Manual_of_Style. 

The CMOS suggests that if a URL or DOI has to be broken at the end of a line, the break should be made after a colon or a double slash (//); before a single slash (/), a tilde (~), a period, a comma, a hyphen, an underline (_), a question mark, a number sign, or a percent symbol; or before or after an equals sign or an ampersand. (CMS 14.18)

To cite original website content include as much of the following as can be determined:  

The title or description of the specific page (if cited). 

The title or description of the site as a whole. 

The owner or sponsor of the site. 

The URL.  

The word website (or web page) may be added (in parentheses) after the title or description of the site if the nature of the source may otherwise be unclear.  

Also include a publication date or date of revision or modification if no date can be determined, include an access date.  

To cite publicly available content shared via social media include the elements listed below. Private content, including direct messages should be treated as a form of personal communication and should be cited in the text or given in a note and rarely listed in a bibliography.

For a citation in a note or bibliography entry, include the following elements:

The author of the post. List the real name (of the person, group, or institution), if known, followed by a screen name, if any, in parentheses. If only a screen name is known, use the screen name in place of the author’s name.

In place of a title, the text of the post. Quote as much as the first 160 characters, including spaces. This is the length of a typical text message. Capitalized as in the original. 

If the post has been quoted in the text, it need not be repeated in a note.

Include the type of post. List the name of the social media service and include a description if relevant (photo, video, etc.).

The date, including month, day, and year. Time stamps are usually unnecessary but may be included to differentiate a post or comment from others on the same day.

A URL. The URL for a specific item can often be found via the date stamp.

Citations of social media content can often be limited to the text, if it is important to provide a link, include a note. A frequently cited account or an extensive thread related to a single subject or post may be included in a bibliography.

Taken from CMOS 14.209

libguide_footer
Login to LibApps Noice of Web Accessibility